Archives for the month of: January, 2014

Yes

“…then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.”

Text: The final lines (Molly Bloom’s monologue) of “Ulysses” by James Joyce.
Location: Back of the Music Millennium building, 3158 East Burnside Street.

Art For Art's Sake [No. 6]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 6]
Location: SE Main Street, Southeast Industrial District

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 1], December 5, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 2], December 11, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 3], December 29, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 4], January 16, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 5], January 23, 2014

Saint Francis and His Friends

St. Francis and His Friends is a bronze sculpture in the courtyard between Loveridge and Peterson Halls on the campus of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing on NW Northrup Street in Portland’s Alphabet District neighborhood. Cast by artist Berthold “Tex” Schiwetz in 1966, the statue has greeted students and faculty for more than 46 years. It was dedicated in 1967, a few months after Loveridge Hall was completed and a year before Peterson Hall was opened for use by students. (Excerpts from the Linfieldpdx Newsletter)

The Beacon of Burnside

The marquee of the Laurelhurst Theater has previously been featured (here) on pdx|cept, but since this beautiful beacon of Burnside Avenue is such an incredible work of art deco design, it definitely deserved another post.

The Laurelhurst Theater became part of Portland’s cultural and architectural history when it first opened in 1923. The original single screen could seat 650 people and was one of the first art deco style theaters of the period. Over the years the Laurelhurst has been added onto and now offers four auditoriums with modern amenities but still maintains its classic appeal. The theater’s four screens bring the best of modern cinema, independent, art and classic film to Portland’s movie lovers. Now celebrating our 12th year as a theater and pub. (From The Laurelhurst Theater website)

Industrial Abstract #9

Industrial Abstract #9
Location: The former Taylor Electric Supply Company building, located between SE Market and SE 3rd Avenue, which was destroyed by fire on May 17, 2006.

See also:
Industrial Abstract #1 (November 10, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #2 (November 15, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #3 (November 21, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #4 (December 2, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #5 (December 9, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #6 (December 26, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #7 (January 13, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #8 (January 20, 2014)

Rollin 'N Tumblin

World Boogie rolled and tumbled its way to Portland on Saturday afternoon (1.25.14) as North Mississippi Allstars hit the in-store stage at Music Millennium and performed an outstanding free show ahead of their concert at Dante’s later that evening.

Brothers Luther Dickinson (lead vocals and guitar) and Cody Dickinson (drums and electric washboard) were raised on Memphis blues, soul, R&B and rock ‘n’ roll, and their late father, Jim, worked with Big Star, the Rolling Stones, The Replacements and many others. With guitarist and bassist Lightnin’ Malcolm rounding out the trio, the scene was set for NMA to tear into an entertaining and innovative set, playing songs from their lastest album World Boogie Is Coming (which Twangville music reviewer Bill Wilcox perfectly described as “a joy ride from start to finish”) along with a few requests shouted out by the audience. “Rollin ‘N Tumblin” was a highlight, featuring Luther’s amazing playing on a two-string guitar made from a coffee can body and broomstick neck. He also amazed the audience with a makeshift slide guitar using a butter knife (literally!) as the slide, and shared the hilarious backstory behind the song “Turn Up Satan”, in which a home heater spewing out costly propane is personified into the fiery breath of Satan to heat up a cold and drafty house and set the scene for a romantic evening. At one point, Luther asked how they sounded, and received a response of roaring applause. “Great,” he continued, “I guess these $20 pawn shop amplifiers are working out just fine! They may be cheap, but, hey—at least we’re portable!” Luther also shared his admiration of Portland, stating that he always enjoys visiting because “it is all coffee shops and record stores—what’s not to like?”

An abundance of great talent, musical connections and influences, and innovative musicianship flows in the blood of NMA, and they create an energetic atmosphere onstage, exuding a geniune love of making music and performing for their audience. The band followed up the show with a meet and greet and CD signing, and were equally engaging offstage as onstage. A huge ‘thank you’ to North Mississippi Allstars for their great performance and to Music Millennium—the greatest music store in Portland—for bringing NMA to their stage.

Lan Su Chinese Garden

Lan Su Chinese Garden is one of Portland’s greatest treasures. Built by Chinese artisans from our sister city Suzhou (home of China’s famous ancient gardens), it is the most authentic Chinese garden outside of China. Much more than just a beautiful garden, Lan Su is a creative wonder—a powerfully inspiring experience based on a 2,000-year-old Chinese tradition that melds art, architecture, design and nature in perfect harmony.

Lan Su is a window into Chinese culture, history and way of thinking. It is modeled after the Ming Dynasty gardens of China, which were designed as spiritual utopias: places where individuals could escape the problems of everyday life and discover their true selves by connecting with nature. Like those ancient gardens, Lan Su is a peaceful and soothing place—a respite from city life that is designed to inspire, facilitate personal growth, and spark creativity.

The garden’s name represents the relationship of sounds from both Portland and Suzhou which are combined to form Lan Su. “Lan” is also the Chinese word for “Orchid” and “Su” is the word for “Arise” or “Awaken,” so the garden’s name can also be interpreted poetically as “Garden of Awakening Orchids.” (Excerpts from the Lan Su website)

Barista: Fine Coffee Purveyors

It is quite surprising that on the bustling and popular NW 23rd Avenue—a beautifully tree-lined street filled with an eclectic mix of shops and restaurants—the options for quality coffee houses are very limited. In this city brimming with exceptional cafés and microroasters (Coava, Stumptown, Ristretto Roasters, Water Avenue Coffee Company, et al.), the lack of options for quality coffee on this trendy thoroughfare has never seemed to make much sense. That all changed on December 11, 2013, as Billy Wilson (a three-time Northwest Regional Barista Champion) opened his fourth location of Barista: Fine Coffee Purveyors at 823 NW 23rd Avenue.

Wonderfully inviting and beautifully designed, this latest addition to the Alphabet District neighborhood features three spacious tufted and buttoned black leather booths, an ornately stamped zinc bar, large gold-framed mirrors, bar seating along the window facing the street, and many other details that create the feeling of a Parisian café in Northwest Portland. The new NW 23rd location joins Barista’s other three Portland locations—Alberta Street in the northeast, NW 13th Avenue in the Pearl, and downtown on SW 3rd Avenue—in “serving exceptional coffee from the world’s finest roasters, prepared by the most skilled baristas in Portland.”

Art For Art's Sake [No. 5]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 5]
Location: Affogato, 8712 N Lombard Street (St. Johns)

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 1], December 5, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 2], December 11, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 3], December 29, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 4], January 16, 2014

Ainsworth Elementary School

Around one of the bends along the winding SW Vista Avenue in the southwest hills of Portland stands Ainsworth Elementary, a picture-perfect, Norman Rockwell-esque elementary school with the classic red brick exterior, playground in front, and tall paned windows which are always lined with children’s artwork. Although this image—which was shot on a bitter cold and misty winter evening—may have a somewhat eerie feeling to it, the setting of this classic school is picturesque in all seasons­. Fall is a particularly beautiful season, when autumn-colored leaves are falling all around the tree-lined schoolyard.

A bit more information from the school’s website: “Ainsworth Elementary is the longest continuously running elementary school in Portland, Oregon. The Ainsworth school building, where the school is housed to this day, was completed on the eve of World War I. Designed by F.A. Naramore in the spirit of English Renaissance schools, the building was dedicated on February 9, 1914. It opened for 207 students and during that first year was served by one principal and seven teachers. The 1914 school building itself has withstood the pressures of use for nearly one hundred years, but many improvements and additions have been made. In 1928, the gymnasium was built. Beneath the gym, an arts-and-crafts room was established which was entered from the back playground. The playgrounds were improved and updated over the years, and today students enjoy several play structures on both the front and back fields. The school was named after Captain John C. Ainsworth, who came to the Pacific Northwest as an experienced Mississippi River steamboat crew member. At the time, navigation on the Columbia River was provided by a number of steamboat companies as well as individually-owned boats. In late 1860, Captain Ainsworth incorporated the Oregon Steam Navigation Company.”

The Southpark Salmon

It seems perfectly fitting that the giant salmon breaking through the brick walls above the entrance to Southpark Seafood Restaurant would be located on SW Salmon Street near the South Park Blocks in downtown Portland. This mighty fish has a perfect view of the outdoor dining below, and must enjoy the wonderful aromas of the delicious creations emanating from the Southpark kitchen.

“Southpark Seafood is a contemporary Northwest seafood restaurant that celebrates the quality products of our local producers. Southpark Seafood is a proud partner of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch® program and PDX Seafood Watch. All of the seafood we sell is fished or farmed in ways that minimize their environmental impact. The amazingly fresh seafood and produce of the Pacific Northwest, along with Chef Ryan Gaul’s passion and innovative culinary vision, delivers a meal that is both creative and delicious to the table at Southpark Seafood.” (From the Southpark website)

Industrial Abstract #8

Industrial Abstract #8
Location: Plumper Pumpkin Patch & Tree Farm, Northwest Portland

See also:
Industrial Abstract #1 (November 10, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #2 (November 15, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #3 (November 21, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #4 (December 2, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #5 (December 9, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #6 (December 26, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #7 (January 13, 2014)

Coffee Break

The perfect ambience for a coffee break: A crisp and foggy night in Portland, brightened by the warm yellow-orange glow of the Water Avenue Commerce Center building and the cool blue light from the giant neon COFFEE sign inside the Water Avenue Coffee Company at 1028 SE Water Street. This excellent roasting factory and cafe has been creating handcrafted coffees since 2009. In their own words: “Rising on the banks of the mighty Willamette River during the mild winter of 2009, the Water Avenue Coffee factory creates handcrafted coffees in Portland’s Southeast Industrial district. Water Avenue Coffee (WAC) is dedicated to bravely pioneering the unseen frontier of micro-roasting craft coffees from countries around the world. Our roasting factory and retail offer a toast to the working class industrial district we are located in. Our bar and counter seating was built with 100 year old reclaimed fir from just blocks away, and our large blue neon COFFEE sign glows all night long as a beacon to travelers on nearby I-5.”

Portlandia (The Statue, Not The Show)

Portlandia is a sculpture by Raymond Kaskey located above the entrance of Michael Graves’ Portland Building at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland. It is the second-largest copper repoussé statue in the United States, after the Statue of Liberty. Unlike the Statue of Liberty, Portlandia may not be reproduced for any commercial purpose without permission from the artist, and the rights to the image of Portlandia remain Kaskey’s sole property.

Installed on October 6, 1985, the statue is based on the design of the city seal. It depicts a woman dressed in classical clothes, holding a trident in the left hand and reaching down with the right hand to greet visitors to the building. The statue itself is 34 feet, 10 inches high. If standing, the woman would be about 50 feet tall.

An accompanying plaque contains a poem by Portland resident Ronald Talney:

She kneels down, and from the quietness of copper, reaches out. We take that stillness into ourselves, and somewhere deep in the earth, our breath becomes her city. If she could speak, this is what she would say: Follow that breath. Home is the journey we make. This is how the world knows where we are.

[Note: Follow this link for a wonderful article by Ronald Talney on the inspiration for the Portlandia poem]

(Excerpts from Wikipedia)

Close Encounters...?

Capturing this wide open barn at just the right sunset moment created an image that seemed reminiscent of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”. The bright, glowing opening in the background created the cinematic effect of vibrant lens flares, making it seem as if alien visitors have landed in the middle of this vast farm land in Oregon City (near the southern limits of the Portland metropolitan area) and might make the effort to communicate. Now all we need is some John Williams music to complete the scene…

Art For Art's Sake [No. 4]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 4]
Subject/Location: Playground at Ainsworth Elementary School, SW Vista Avenue

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 1], December 5, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 2], December 11, 2013
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 3], December 29, 2013

Rough Rider

Henry Waldo Coe was a prominent Portland physician and politician, and among his many achievements and contributions, he commissioned and donated four statues to the city of Portland in the 1920s. The tributes to Abraham Lincoln (The President by American sculptor George Fite Waters) and Joan of Arc by Emmanuel Frémiet have previously been featured on pdx|cept (see links below), and today’s post features the third in the series: Theodore Roosevelt, Rough Rider by American artist Alexander Phimister Proctor. Along with the Lincoln tribute, this bronze equestrian statue is located in the South Park Blocks near the Portland Art Museum. The sculpture depicts Theodore Roosevelt, former President of the United States, as the leader of the cavalry regiment called the Rough Riders, who fought during the Spanish–American War. Standing nearly 20 feet tall (including the base), the sculpture was cast in Brooklyn, New York, and after a journey by sea via the Panama Canal, it arrived in Portland in 1922. The fourth sculpture to be donated to the city by Coe—George Washington by sculptor Pompeo Coppini—will be featured in a future post.

See also:
Paris in Portland: Saint Joan of Laurelhurst (November 1, 2013)
The President (November 8, 2013)

Paris In Portland: 10 Scoops

A simply beautiful display of vintage ice cream scoops, shot at the wonderfully Parisian-inspired Oui Presse on SE Hawthorne Boulevard. Click here for more on this little slice of Paris in Portland.

Industrial Abstract #7

Industrial Abstract #7
Location: Southeast Industrial District

See also:
Industrial Abstract #1 (November 10, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #2 (November 15, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #3 (November 21, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #4 (December 2, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #5 (December 9, 2013)
Industrial Abstract #6 (December 26, 2013)

We'll Be Right Back

If you are familiar with the pdx|cept “About” section, you already know that this blog loves all things Portland…except the weather! Although we’ve had a few appearances of that glowing orb in the sky lately, the mostly gray and very cold days of the winter months have taken their toll. It’s time to take a short break and find a little place in the sun. We’ll be right back, though…returning to the daily posts on Monday, January 13.