Archives for the month of: March, 2014

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | March 31, 2014
Subject: Stumptown Coffee Roasters | Location: 128 Southwest 3rd Avenue, Portland

The Colors of Spring

It may be taking its time arriving, but the colors of spring are slowly beginning to appear all around Portland. This Victorian home/office on Northwest 23rd Place seems to be ahead of the game with its cheery spring colors and blossoming tree framing its entrance…

Don't Judge A Book(store) By Its Cover

The world-famous Portland landmark—Powell’s City of Books—is currently undergoing a facelift, of sorts. Since January 13, 2014, the southeast portion of Powell’s flagship store (on the corner of Northwest 10th Avenue and West Burnside Avenue) has been under construction, in a project that will continue for approximately six months. The results will be unveiled in the summer of 2014, and according to the Powell’s website, the improvements will include: A fresh exterior; a new roof; a new ‘front porch’ with a more spacious, pedestrian-friendly entrance; relocated and expanded bicycle parking; an updated floor plan; new lighting; skylights; energy-efficient windows; and more. Fortunately, the iconic “Powell’s Books” marquee will be preserved! For a look at an illustrated rendering of the project plan, visit the Powell’s City of Books website here.

Industrial Abstract #14

Industrial Abstract #14
Location: Northeast Industrial District, Portland

See also:
Industrial Abstract #10 (February 9, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #11 (February 19, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #12 (February 27, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #13 (March 22, 2014)

Ecola State Park

Heading back to the Oregon Coast for today’s post—to the beautiful and scenic Ecola State Park in Cannon Beach. “Wrapping around Tillamook Head, between Seaside and Cannon Beach, Ecola State Park stretches along 9 miles of coastline and offers outstanding sightseeing and recreation opportunities combined with a storied past. Though the scenic and hiking opportunities may be the main allure, the diversity of outdoor recreation including picnicking, tidepooling, surfing and wildlife observation make Ecola State park a destination year round.” (Excerpt from the Oregon State Parks website)

Sign Language Volume 5

Sign Language | Volume 5
Subject: The Man’s Shop
Location: 8511 North Lombard Street, St. Johns, North Portland

See also:
Sign Language | Volume 1 (February 7, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 2 (February 16, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 3 (March 7, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 4 (March 15, 2014)

When Passions Collide

The 49th season of the Portland Opera (2013-2014) features four operas which deal with the subject of passion pushed to the extreme. The theme of the season is “When Passions Collide”, and features two all-new productions and several significant company debuts. Highlights include an all-new production of Strauss’ Salome as well as the Company premiere of an all-new production—and collaboration with the San Francisco Conservatory of Music—of Dominick Argento’s Postcard from Morocco. Also making its premiere at Portland Opera is Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance, featuring the directorial debut of Oregon Shakespeare Festival Artistic Director Bill Rauch. Other season debuts include acclaimed sopranos Elizabeth Futral and Kelly Cae Hogan. “At Portland Opera, we are passionate about what we do and indeed, passion plays a fundamental role in opera, ” says Portland Opera General Director Christopher Mattaliano. “And this season that’s exactly what we will explore. What happens when passion is all consuming? When passion goes too far.”

(Photographed at the Portland Opera corporate offices; Text excerpts from The Portland Opera website)

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | March 24, 2014
Subject: A cinnamon-topped cappuccino at St.Honoré Boulangerie | Location: Millennium Plaza, Lake Oswego

One Final Week

There is only one week left to view Francis Bacon’s “Three Studies of Lucian Freud” at the Portland Art Museum. After March 30, 2014, the large, expressive triptych —recently famous for being the most expensive piece of artwork ever sold at auction ($142.4 million)—will make its way back to the owner’s private collection. For another view and the notes on the original post, see here.

Industrial Abstract #13

Industrial Abstract #13
Location: Northwest 24th Avenue, Portland

See also:
Industrial Abstract #8 (January 20, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #9 (January 27, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #10 (February 9, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #11 (February 19, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #12 (February 27, 2014)

The Green Giant

Another view of that great ‘green giant’, The Hawthorne Bridge, a Portland landmark since 1910. The original color of the bridge was black, lasting until 1964, when it was repainted yellow ochre. During the 1998-99 renovation, the color was changed to its current distinctive green with red trim.

See also:
The Hawthorne Bridge (January 4, 2014)

Paris In Portland: The Spirit of the Dance

Through posture and gesture, this exuberant figure embodies the Spirit of the Dance (1873). Most artists of this period depicted abstract ideas, such as dance, art, and love through symbols, but Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux chose to bring the concept to vivid life. He modeled his sculpture on the dancers he sketched at the Paris Opéra. In 1865, Carpeaux was commissioned to create a large sculptural monument, titled The Dance, for the front façade of the Paris Opéra building. Though the work was considered risqué when it was first installed, it eventually proved a popular success and small models of individual figures from the monument were made and sold to collectors. Spirit of the Dance is a model of the central figure from the larger sculptural group. (Photographed at the Portland Art Museum; Text excerpt from the Portland Art Museum website)

See also:
Paris In Portland: 10 Scoops (January 14, 2014)
Paris In Portland: Aristide Maillol (December 13, 2013)
Paris In Portland: Saint Joan of Laurelhurst (November 1, 2013)
Portland + A Touch of Paris = Oui Press (October 11, 2013)

Two Things

Two things: 1) Cinema 21 is one of Portland’s great cinema treasures (see this earlier post). 2) Now showing in an exclusive engagement at this great Portland cinema treasure is Wes Anderson’s incredible new film “The Grand Budapest Hotel”. Reviewer David Kaplan (of Kaplan vs. Kaplan) sums it up nicely: “Pick an adjective, any adjective—droll, rollicking, wacky, whimsical, eccentric, absurd and even ludicrous—to describe director Wes Anderson’s latest film, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”. Set between the world wars in the fictional country of Zubrowka in Eastern Europe, this movie is also very funny—hysterical in parts—featuring a huge, seasoned cast. The late Robert Altman would have loved this film, which practically demands a second viewing.”

As with all Wes Anderson films, “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is a visual feast, with every carefully composed frame a separate work of art. Under Anderson’s direction, the cinematography of Robert D. Yeoman, art direction of Stephan O. Gessler, production design of Adam Stockhausen, and music of Alexandre Desplat blend beautifully with the stellar cast and brilliant screenplay (by Anderson) to create a thoroughly enjoyable cinematic experience. See this great film in this wonderful Portland cinema treasure!

Pod

Pod is the name of a 2002 modern sculpture by American artist Pete Beeman, currently installed at Southwest 10th Avenue and West Burnside Street in downtown Portland. The 30-foot sculpture, intended to represent the “infrastructure, energy, and vibrancy of Portland”, is supported by its static tripod base with a 15-foot diameter. It is constructed from stainless steel, galvanized steel, bronze, titanium, lead and other materials. Pod was fabricated by Beeman and David Bermudez, and engineered by Beeman and Peterson Structural Engineers. It is considered interactive and kinetic, with a central, vertical pendulum that swings back and forth when pushed. The sculpture cost as much as $50,000 and was funded by the Portland Streetcar Project. Of the work’s design, Beeman said:“I was thinking about how Portland is designed and planned and built, and how the planning and infrastructure of Portland is really important in what makes Portland great. I was thinking of the static tripod as the infrastructure. The moving part was the vibrancy and life. The most interesting part of the sculpture will be watching people try to move it.”

(Source: Wikipedia)

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | March 17, 2014
Subject: Sterling Coffee Roasters | Location:417 Northwest 21st Avenue, Portland

Signs Of Spring

Patches of beautiful blue sky. Breaks of sun. Cherry blossom trees beginning to burst with color along the waterfront by the Burnside Bridge. Signs of Spring are appearing all over Portland, and are a very welcome sight!

Sign Language Volume 4

Sign Language | Volume 4
Subject: Clinton Street Video
Location: 2501 Southeast Clinton Street

See also:
Sign Language | Volume 1 (February 7, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 2 (February 16, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 3 (March 7, 2014)

Portland à la Parrish

A dramatic, painterly sky, reminiscent of Maxfield Parrish, shot in downtown Portland near SW 13th Avenue.

Second Story Sushi Haven

Since 2004, Masu has been Portland’s “second story sushi haven”. Lovers of outstanding sushi and Japanese cuisine enter Masu on SW 13th Avenue and ascend a steep flight of stairs to arrive at an elegantly minimal mid-century modern loft which seems to always have an endlessly perfect ambient soundtrack playing in the background and a perfectly endless selection of the freshest sushi creations and specialty items on the menu. For over a decade now, the locally owned and family operated Masu continues to be one of Portland’s finest dining experiences.

The Heroic Man

This large figurative bronze sculpture, entitled “Man (The Heroic Man)” and created between 1928 and 1935, is the second in a series of images photographed in June 2013 at the Portland Art Museum exhibit MAN/WOMAN: Gaston Lachaise (see also here). The following excerpt by Jeffrey Carlson of Fine Art Today discusses the exhibit and the work of the great American sculptor of French birth:

Most widely known for his work that celebrates the female nude, Gaston Lachaise (1882-1935) also occupies an extremely important place in American art history. Working in the early 20th century, Lachaise aspired to create universal forms to represent man and woman. In the years immediately preceding abstract art, Lachaise’s purpose coincided with those of several post-Impressionists, who sought to express in symbols what realist art had been doing in literal terms. “What I am aiming to express is the glorification of the human being, of the human body, of the human spirit with all there is of daring magnificence,” he remarked. “MAN/WOMAN” posits Lachaise as a forerunner to abstraction because of this move away from mimesis, or a replication of visual reality, and toward a more symbolic understanding of forms.