Archives for the month of: May, 2014

Art For Art's Sake [No. 15]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 15]
Subject: “Watering Can Fountain” | Location: Sauvie Island Lavender Farm,20230 NW Sauvie Island Road, Portland

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 10], March 11, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 11], April 1, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 12], April 24, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 13], May 4, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 14], May 20, 2014

That's Why I'm Here

I don’t usually do personal posts on pdx|cept, but I am breaking form today to send out a welcome to the great James Taylor as he and his all-star band arrive in the Rose City for a performance tonight at The Moda Center (formerly The Rose Garden). By all accounts, James Taylor is a performer who appreciates his fans as much as they appreciate him, and he even sings about this mutual gratitude in “That’s Why I’m Here”: “Fortune and fame’s such a curious game. Perfect strangers can call you by name. Pay good money to hear ‘Fire and Rain’ again and again and again. Some are like summer coming back every year, got your baby got your blanket got your bucket of beer. I break into a grin from ear to ear and suddenly it’s perfectly clear. That’s why I’m here.”

I have admired and loved the music and lyrics of James Taylor for over 40 years—it is some of the first music I can remember listening to and it feels as familiar as an old friend—but until now, I have never seen him perform live. All that will change tonight as I sing along with every song and cheer on James Taylor and his band from my front row seat! Welcome to Portland JT!

Tall Trees

A view of the northern end of Cannon Beach from the vantage point of Ecola State Park. Although Haystack Rock (seen at bottom left) is over 235 feet tall, from this perspective it appears to be dwarfed by one of the majestic tall trees that line the coastal park.

Industrial Abstract #21

Industrial Abstract #21
Location:SE Madison Street at SE 9th Avenue, Portland

See also:
Industrial Abstract #16 (April 12, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #17 (April 22, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #18 (April 30, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #19 (May 8, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #20 (May 17, 2014)

For The Birds

An example of one of the many creative bird houses that pop up out of the lush and abundant herb garden at McMenamin’s Edgefield, located just east of Portland in Troutdale. “Originally a flower garden for residents of Edgefield Manor, this herb garden was Edgefield’s first cultivated plot. Along the paths, you’ll find craft, medicinal and cooking herbs mingled with many Northwest plants, fruits and flowers to attract hummingbirds and butterflies.” (Excerpt from the McMenamins Edgefield Self-Guided Tour Map)

In Memoriam

An exception to the typical format of ‘all things Portland’ on pdx|cept today, in honor of Memorial Day and all those who have died while serving in our nation’s armed forces. This image was photographed at the United States Marine Corps War Memorial in Virginia near Arlington National Cemetery.

“Based on an iconic image of the second flag-raising on the island of Iwo Jima during World War II, the United States Marine Corps War Memorial represents this nation’s gratitude to Marines and those who have fought beside them. While the statue depicts one of the most famous incidents of World War II, the memorial is dedicated to all Marines who have given their lives in the defense of the United States since 1775.” (Excerpt from the National Park Service website)

Frank Manor House: Part Four

The final in the series highlighting the Frank Manor House on the campus of Lewis & Clark College in Southwest Portland features the fountain off the back terrace with three ornamental fish as the main feature, with a terrraced waterfall that flows into a large reflecting pool. On a very clear day, Mt. Hood can be seen between the trees in the distance.

Frank Manor House: Part Three

A detail of the lattice-patterned brick work and figurative heads carved of solid white oak that embellish one of several courtyards of the Frank Manor House on the campus of Lewis & Clark College in Southwest Portland.

Frank Manor House: Part Two

A full view of the Frank Manor House on the campus of Lewis & Clark College in Southwest Portland, designed by architect Herman Brookman and built between 1924-25. The graceful lattice-patterned and multi-colored brick work, hand-carved wood embellishments, undulating slate tile roof, gothic carved stone sculptural elements, terraced gardens and verdant natural setting all combine to give this 35-room Tudor-style mansion the honor of being one of Portland’s most beautiful and interesting buildings.

Frank Manor House: Part One

This is the first in a series of posts featuring images of one of Portland’s most beautiful and interesting buildings. The Frank Manor House, built in 1924-25, is a 35-room Tudor-style mansion on the campus of Lewis & Clark College in Southwest Portland. Today’s post features a detail of one of the many intricately hand-carved wood embellishments that run along the top of doorways or windows, adding character and charm to this architectural wonder.

Eastbank Esplanade

A view of the Hawthorne Bridge, spanning the Willamette River, photographed along the Eastbank Esplanade. (Two more perspectives of this very photogenic bridge can be viewed here and here.)

Art For Art's Sake [No. 14]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 14]
Subject: “Wireface” | Location: The ReBuilding Center, 3625 North Mississippi Avenue, Portland

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 9], March 1, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 10], March 11, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 11], April 1, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 12], April 24, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 13], May 4, 2014

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | May 19, 2014
Subject: Coffee art à la the sandwich board at Oui Presse | Location: 1740 SE Hawthorne Boulevard, Portland

Vista House

An interior view of the Vista House which was built as a rest stop observatory for travelers on the old Columbia River Gorge Highway and as a fitting memorial honoring Oregon’s pioneers—particularly those who made their way down the Columbia River. Described by its architect, Edgar M. Lazarus, as “a temple to the natural beauty of the Gorge,” Vista House has long been recognized for its historic significance and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.
(Excerpts from the Vista House website)

Industrial Abstract #20

Industrial Abstract #20
Location: Southeast Industrial District, Portland

See also:
Industrial Abstract #15 (April 4, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #16 (April 12, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #17 (April 22, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #18 (April 30, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #19 (May 8, 2014)

The Dunes

The windswept dunes of Cannon Beach on the Oregon Coast.

Sign Language Volume 9

Sign Language | Volume 9
Subject: Mississippi Records
Location: 5202 North Albina Avenue, Portland

See also:
Sign Language | Volume 4 (March 15, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 5 (March 26, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 6 (April 6, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 7 (April 19, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 8 (May 3, 2014)

Iron Ghosts

A detail view of the towering sculpture Inversion: Plus Minus, located at the junction of Southeast Grand Avenue and Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard, created by artists/architects Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Seattle-based Lead Pencil Studio. Using weathered steel angle iron, the artists are presenting “ghosts” of former buildings, featuring a matrix of metal that almost appears as a solid building. In the artists’ words, “The sculptures reference the outer shells of ordinary industrial buildings found in the Central Eastside Industrial Area like those that once existed on the project sites.” Thus, Inversion: Plus Minus can be said to provide a glimpse of what had existed and a reference to a past—of buildings that once stood in this place. By presenting the idea as a void or a shadow of a building, not solid, but permeable, with the wind and the rain having full access, this tumbleweed-like aesthetic gives viewers an opportunity to imagine and to capture a sky, a volume, or a gesture, and to give one an experience.

(Excerpts from The Regional Arts & Culture Council (RACC) website and The University of Oregon School of Architecture and Allied Arts Blog)

The Little Red Shed

The Little Red Shed at McMenamins Edgefield is a cozy hideaway that’s charming enough to have been created by J.R.R. Tolkien himself. Once serving as incinerator in the property’s poor farm days, this convivial pub comfortably seats up to 10 people. Here, guests relax and enjoy favorite McMenamins ales and distilled spirits, guest liquors and cigars in the glow of a brick fireplace. During the summer, free live music is played under the neighboring alder and maple trees. (Excerpt from the McMenamins website)

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | May 12, 2014
Subject: Long, tall shadows on the warm and weathered wood floors of Coffeehouse-Five | Location: 740 North Killingsworth Street, Portland