Archives for the month of: June, 2014

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | June 30, 2014
Subject: Local Roasting Co. | Location: 1932 NW Lovejoy Street, Portland
Comments: “We are a locally owned, independent coffee shop and roaster in Portland, OR. We started roasting beans in 2012, and with help from our friends, we were able to turn a piece of the old Film Exchange building in Northwest Portland into a cozy little spot to roast coffee and serve tasty beverages. We roast our beans in small batches on our brand new, energy efficient Diedrich IR-5 two to three times a week, so all the coffee we serve in the shop is about as fresh as it can be. As with all crops, coffee beans are seasonal, so we offer the best coffee we can get our hands on throughout the year, and we try and purchase certified organic beans whenever possible.” (Excerpt from the Local Roasting Co. website)

Eternus

Eternus is a bronze relief of waves dedicated “To those lost at sea, with special affection for the fishermen of the Pacific Northwest”. The sculpture was commissioned by the Newport Fishermen’s Wives and was dedicated in 1988 at the Yaquina Head Lighthouse, which stands near the mouth of the Yaquina River near Newport on the Oregon Coast. The work was created by sculptor, art historian and collector Mark Sponenburgh (1916–2012). In addition to having a remarkable career as an educator, Sponenburgh was also one of the “Monuments Men”, and served with the Corps of Engineers during World War II, overseeing the recovery of a huge trove of stolen art the Nazis had hidden in the Altaussee salt mines near Salzburg, Austria.

Vista View

View from the 120-foot Vista Bridge (officially named Vista Avenue Viaduct), an arch bridge for vehicles and pedestrians which connects the areas of King’s Hill and Vista Ridge in the Goose Hollow neighborhood of Southwest Portland. Construction on the bridge began in 1925, and the bridge was opened in 1926. The MAX Light Rail line and SW Jefferson Street travel under the bridge, and Vista Avenue crosses the bridge.

(Excerpt from Wikipedia)

Sign Language Volume 12

Sign Language | Volume 12
Subject: Portland Outdoor Store
Location: Corner of SW 3rd Avenue and SW Oak Street, Portland

See also:
Sign Language | Volume 7 (April 19, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 8 (May 3, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 9 (May 15, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 10 (June 1, 2014)
Sign Language | Volume 11 (June 8, 2014)

Paris In Portland: The Art Of The Louvre’s Tuileries Garden • Part Four •

The fourth in a series of posts highlighting the Portland Art Museum’s outstanding international exhibition, The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden—exploring the art, design, and evolution of Paris’ most famous garden. Today’s post features Pomona, or Allegory of Spring by François Barois; it is one of a set of two large ‘herms’—rectangular tapering stone posts bearing a head or torso—a popular classical form often used for garden sculpture.

Industrial Abstract #24

Industrial Abstract #24
Location: The Brewery Blocks, located at the former site of the Blitz-Weinhard Brewery, is a five-block shopping and professional district in Portland’s vibrant, post-industrial neighborhood known as the Pearl District. This image was shot at Brewery Block No. 2, at the corner of NW 12th Avenue and NW Couch Street.

See also:
Industrial Abstract #19 (May 8, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #20 (May 17, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #21 (May 28, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #22 (June 5, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #23 (June 15, 2014)

Scenic Sauvie Island

Sauvie Island is a picturesque area of sprawling farmland, wildlife refuge, beaches, lakes and nature preserves—and it is only a short drive 10 miles northwest of downtown Portland. The vistas and views are seemingly endless, like this scenic landscape of a lone tree set against the towering, snow-covered Mt. Hood in the distance.

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | June 23, 2014
Subject: Petunia’s Pies & Pastries | Location: 610 SW 12th Avenue, Portland
Comments: An almond milk cappuccino along with delicious treats from Petunia’s Pies & Pastries that truly live up to their tag line: “The best darn baked goods you will ever have. (They happen to be gluten free & vegan.)”

Paris In Portland: The Art Of The Louvre’s Tuileries Garden • Part Three •

The third in a series of posts highlighting the Portland Art Museum’s outstanding international exhibition, The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden—exploring the art, design, and evolution of Paris’ most famous garden. Today’s post features one of the two large banners on either side of the museum’s main entrance: The right side features the Garden As History banner, with Aristide Maillol’s graceful sculpture La Montagne (The Mountain) set in the foreground; On the left (featured as today’s post) Maillol’s dramatic La Riviére (The River) is placed before the Garden As Art banner.

City Scenes | No. 2

City Scenes | No. 2
Subject: Fremont Bridge & Northwest Waterfront buildings | Location: View from The Fields Neighborhood Park in the Pearl District, NW Overton Street and NW 11th Avenue

Peruvian Passion: Second Course

Andina—the Pearl District gem serving up adventurous Peruvian cuisine—has been featured previously on pdx|cept (here), and now it is time for the second course. At Andina, each delicious dish is prepared as a beautiful work of art, created with passion and presented with great attention to detail. A perfect example of this is the anticucho de pulpo: a grilled octopus kebob with rocoto and caper chimichurri.

Art For Art's Sake [No. 16]

Art For Art’s Sake [No. 16]
Subject: “Garibaldi Abstract” | Location: Near the Garibaldi Museum,
Garibaldi, Oregon

See also:
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 11], April 1, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 12], April 24, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 13], May 4, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 14], May 20, 2014
Art For Art’s Sake [No. 15], May 31, 2014

Paris In Portland: The Art Of The Louvre's Tuileries Garden • Part Two •

The second in a series of posts highlighting the Portland Art Museum’s outstanding international exhibition, The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden—exploring the art, design, and evolution of Paris’ most famous garden. Today’s post features the monumental bronze Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent (1824) by François Joseph Bosio.

“Featuring bold action and intense muscularity, this monumental bronze sculpture depicts the battle between the Greco-Roman hero Hercules and the river god Achelous for the affection of the nymph Deianira. During their struggle, Achelous transforms himself into a series of animals including a great serpent, but he is no match for the strength of the half-man, half-god Hercules. Due to the superhuman vitality, courage, and ultimate immortality of Hercules, many French kings—including Louis XIV—associated themselves with this powerful figure from antiquity. Bosio’s sculpture juxtaposes the classical ideal of the male nude with the passion of Romanticism, embodied in the dramatic composition and powerful entwining serpent.” (Excerpt from the Portland Art Museum exhibit description)

End Of An Era

Very sadly, Jackpot Records—the longstanding Portland record store which opened in 1997—has announced it will be closing its downtown location effective June 30, 2014. Fortunately, Jackpot’s Eastside location (at 3574 SE Hawthorne Boulevard, where today’s posted photo was shot) will remain open.

The full statement from owner Isaac Slusarenko reads:

“Today Jackpot Records would like to announce that as of June 30th 2014, we will be closing our downtown store on SW 9th Avenue. We consider the choice to close our doors downtown as part of the store’s evolution; a move that will help us focus more energy and resources on other pursuits.While the rents have gone up over the years and the city we all love and contribute to continues to change in ways that both help and hurt local businesses like Jackpot, these factors really don’t play into this decision as much as they could.Jackpot Records is still committed to helping hungry minds and ears discover new sounds and grow their music collections. The SE Hawthorne store will remain open and will continue our ambition of sharing fantastic music with Portland with all that much more vigor. While it’s sad to close this chapter of Jackpot’s history, and say goodbye to our downtown neighbors and clientele of over 15 years, we make this announcement without heaviness in our hearts.We look forward to putting even more focus and time into projects like our Jackpot Records record label, now in its tenth year of pressing immaculate vinyl for both new artists, high-end reissues of long obscured albums, and internationally appreciated musicians such as Devo and Etta James.The days spent at the downtown store are a thing of wonder and part of Portland’s history that we’ve all built together. Instead of looking at this move as a loss of any kind, we feel instead that it represents a continued celebration of music, art, culture and community that we’re proud to be a part of, and can’t wait to see where it takes us next.”

Coffee Break Monday

Coffee Break Monday | June 16, 2014
Subject: Piazza Italia | Location: 1129 NW Johnson Street, Portland
Comments: Cappuccino and affogato at the wonderfully lively Piazza Italia…Portland’s version of the Grand Ticino from “Moonstruck”…

Industrial Abstract #23

Industrial Abstract #23
Location: The former Taylor Electric Supply Company building, located between SE Clay Street and SE 2nd Avenue, which was destroyed by fire on May 17, 2006.

See also:
Industrial Abstract #18 (April 30, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #19 (May 8, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #20 (May 17, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #21 (May 28, 2014)
Industrial Abstract #22 (June 5, 2014)

Paris In Portland: The Art Of The Louvre's Tuileries Garden | Part One

Paris arrives in the Park Blocks beginning today with the Portland Art Museum opening of The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden, a stunning international exhibition exploring the art, design, and evolution of Paris’ most famous garden. The Tuileries, which stretches from the Louvre to the Place de la Concorde in central Paris, was originally created in 1564 in the Italian style and became the city’s first public park in 1667.

Today’s post (the first in a series of future posts on this subject) features a terracotta bust of Louis XV as a child, sculpted by Antoine Coysevox in 1719. “When Louis XIV died in 1715, his great-grandson Louis XV was his only living male heir and thus became king at the tender age of five. In that year, Louis XV moved from Versailles to the Tuileries Palace, which the royal family had vacated in 1671. This terracotta bust shows him as a child, a few years after his ascent to the throne. Despite the king’s youth, Coysevox imbues him with an air of authority by depicting him as a stately figure in sophisticated clothing and a flowing wig.”

(Excerpts from the Portland Art Museum website and exhibit descriptions)

House Of Sound

In the 1950s and 1960s, North Williams Avenue in Portland was the center of the black cultural community, with jazz and social clubs, churches, and businesses like House of Sound, an iconic record and clothing store. Before the House of Sound building was torn down (as a result of gentrification of the area), Portland artist and filmmaker Vanessa Renwick acquired the sign and used it as part of a video art installation piece in 2009. The sign now resides on display at Mississippi Records on North Albina Avenue.

Roman Relief

Detail of the Roman funerary portrait Sabdibel and Yarkhibonna (CE 150/200), a limestone relief excavated from the ancient Aramaic city of Palymyra in central Syria, on display in the permanent collection of the Portland Art Museum.

Phase Two

In the background, the streamlined exterior side of The Janey I, a highly sustainable 6 story apartment building of 50 units located at 1155 NW Everett Street in Portland’s Pearl District. In the foreground, the beginning stages of The Janey II­—the second phase of the project—which will consist of a 9 story, 62-apartment building with retail spaces on the ground level. Exterior finishes will match the Janey I entirely, including the bronze aluminum windows and sophisticated color pattern of the surface materials.